Yellowstone reopened to the south with little chance after an unseen flood

Available to visitors travel on the south side – entering the East, West and South entrances of the park – involves an alternating license plate system, with a few exceptions, the National Park Service said.

That system would allow cars with licenses ending in a different number to enter the park on other days of the month, while the numbers (including zero) would give Should be entered on the same days of the month, according to the service.

That would slow down the flow of visitors, said the tobacco service. While there were “big backbacks” on Wednesday morning, they cleaned up every door within a few hours, tobacco officials said in a news release.

Less than 5,000 cars entered the south side on Wednesday – a significant difference from the usual 10,000 or more cars that entered, the parking service said.

“While it’s early in the morning to announce if the licensing system has worked, it appears that it has done its job by cutting our standard number in half,” said park manager Cam. Sholly in a word. “We are thrilled to have visitors to Yellowstone and appreciate the patience of the public and community partners as we continue to work in this difficult situation.”

Cars, campers and wagons are parked before sunrise Wednesday outside the south gate of Yellowstone National Park waiting to enter for the first time before one. week.

Cars, campers and wagons are parked before sunrise Wednesday outside the south gate of Yellowstone National Park waiting to enter for the first time before one. week.

Photographs by George Frey / Getty

The park’s north gate, which is entered by the North and Northeast entrances, was closed, service resumed.

The park – which covers parts of Idaho, Montana and Wyoming – and surrounding cities were flooded by rain and flash floods created by mud, rocks and dangerous conditions. Other, officials said. Roads were washed away in many places, and others were affected by rubbish and fallen trees after the flood, officials said.
Heavy rains combined with rapid melting have led to flooding in the Yellowstone River an event of 1 in 500 years, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).
Tourism officials around Yellowstone National Park are worrying about the financial consequences after a historical period that closed the site. CNN’s Fredricka Whitfield spoke with Shawn Darr, who runs the Little Trail Creek Cabins in Gardiner, Montana, about whether he and his family can survive, financially.
“The cars (Yellowstone National Park) are re -entering this morning thanks to the hard work and dedication of so many partners,” Wyoming Gov. For Gordon said on Twitter Wednesday. “This is great news for our nearby community and the Wyoming tourist.”
The park’s right door is expected to reopen in the next two weeks, after cleaning, cleaning and inspections are completed, the park said in a news release earlier this year. week.

CNN’s Claudia Dominguez and Paradise Afshar gave the show.

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