With the advent of school masking, some kids may need help fixing: Shots

It’s not fun to change the use of masks for many children, but leaving them can be embarrassing. Children may need help to correct.

Photos by Jena Ardell / Getty


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Photos by Jena Ardell / Getty


It’s not fun to change the use of masks for many children, but leaving them can be embarrassing. Children may need help to correct.

Photos by Jena Ardell / Getty

Many children in the country today choose to show their laughter during the day. It’s a change for kids who have been accustomed to wearing a face mask since they came back to social classes, and it may be embarrassing for some.

In recent weeks, every state except Hawaiʻi has increased its school mask requirement. But implementation is different in the country. For example, if you are a student in Minnesota you need to wear a mask on the school bus. And some districts like Boston and San Diego continue to have mask demands in the building for now. Others recommend masking even though it is not necessary.

Some of the children liked the changes. Grace Richards was glad she didn’t have to wear her Hello Kitty mask in second grade at her elementary school in Petaluma, Calif.

“I can open it and we can see what each person is like!” said Richards with a laugh. “I knew I was safe because we had to be at arm’s length away from each other while eating and drinking.”

That is not correct. Richards would have struggled if he was in the same room as the one with COVID-19. Social-distancing protocols are helping to keep the low profile, which is why Garrett Glass is leaving his mask on at his fifth grade in San Anselmo, Calif.

“We sat, as it were, three feet apart,” Glass said. “So I’m not too worried about getting the class.”

Glass wasn’t really disappointed when one of his classmates tried to recover from the illness last week. “I knew everyone in our class was full, so I wasn’t too scared,” he said.

Fourth graders Kenley (left) and Anakin Gupta on the grounds of their school, Montclair Elementary School in Oakland, on March 7, 2022.

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Fourth graders Kenley (left) and Anakin Gupta on the grounds of their school, Montclair Elementary School in Oakland, on March 7, 2022.

Lesley McClurg / KQED

However, many children may not feel safe immediately after being told that masks save lives. And some families – especially those with a significant family member – may want to continue masking.

Of course, while common cases are common around the country, local conditions vary and there are communities where the mask is applied to a patient. But going against the wheat at school, as we all know, is not fun.

Some kids on the playground in Oakland are totally against everything. Ten -year -old Kenley Gupta, a four -year -old, didn’t like his mask, but he wasn’t ready to throw it away.

“Most of the time it’s not pleasant and it keeps going down my nose,” Gupta said. “It’s just a sad thing that’s hanging over me.”

However, she said it was also scary to take off her red veil. “The disease is going on so I think it’s much better to be safe.”

Gupta said there were more children in every class at his school – “without eyes, and people would sneeze and there would be lots of germs.”

Eleven -year -old Tabitha Kadel could no longer agree. She is doubling down by wearing a uniform and veil at her school in Alameda, Calif.

There is good information that shows which masks protect children, although it depends if the mask is applied, the type of mask and the way you are doing it. Kadel also points out some good and bad things.

“I appreciate hiding my belly,” Kadel said. “But it’s hard to breathe when I’m running PE and it’s hard to see what people are like.” He would wait a week or two before revealing his full face.

Not only that. Health officials in California are “strongly urging” the mask to be used in K-12 schools, rather than training or voting.

Changing mask protocols may be difficult for some children.

“It’s normal for kids to feel some anxiety,” says Jennifer Louie, a medical psychologist at the Child Mind Institute, which does not contribute to children’s mental health. “They need time. Parents can provide reassurance and support.”

Louie encourages parents to be flexible by asking them lots of questions about what they think, and says it’s important to be sure of what the child has to say.

“Like, ‘Yeah, yeah, that’s right, you’re worried. I’m a little nervous.’ And it can help alleviate their anxiety. Oh, the parents thought this. It’s worth it. ‘”

He said the children needed to explain why the situation was safe now. Parents can talk about reducing the number of cases and having more medications. These are the details to help children understand the big picture.

The playground can be in turmoil when some kids throw on masks and others take care of them. Louie hopes to go before her peers try to explain that the problem is different for each family.

“For example, ‘we can just control what we do. And that’s why we do it,'” Louie said. “And, you see, we can talk about it.

If the younger children saw Louie being teased, the parents told their children to ask an adult to help. For children it is better to practice the bully because the bully will only work if the bully rises. You can help your child think of some things he or she can say to prevent the bully from getting what he or she wants.

“Because if you take the bait you will be eaten,” said Louie. “The whole point is, you have to do things that it’s not comfortable for the bully to do.”

He said it would be wise to tell the children to return their masks if any other problems arose.

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