The researchers found 12 semidetached mass-transfer binaries in the galaxy M31

hoku binary

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Most recently, PhD student Li Fuxing, Prof. Qian Shengbang and their colleagues from Yunnan Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences found 12 semidetached mass-transfer massive binaries from a total of 437 eclipsing binaries in the Andromeda galaxy (M31). The two (larger) lobes fill their Roche lobes, and the major ones are separated from the lobes.

Their information is published in The Astronomical Newspaper on the 8th of April.

M31 is the closest spiral galaxy to the Milky Way and the largest galaxy in the Interior. Its building and its metal structure are very close to those of the Milky Way.

Because of the great distance of M31 from Earth, most of the eclipsing binaries found in M31 are large binaries, and only a few binaries have been investigated for the distance modulus of M31. Therefore, it is not clear to understand the characteristics and developmental status of these binaries with the major binaries in the Milky Way.

In this study, the researchers found that the relationship between the mass ratio and the full charge of the first star indicates that they are at the stage of converting the slow mass from smaller particles. to their peers with conversion ratio.

Currently, the thermal distribution of the primary and secondary stars of these binaries is similar to that of semidetached binaries in the Milky Way.

These facts show the evolution of large binaries in M31 similar to the Milky Way, providing a critical test of the models of the mass transfer of large binaries.


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More information:
F.-X. Li et al, Semidetached Mass-transfer Massive Binaries on a nearby Galaxy M31, The Astronomical Newspaper (2022). DOI: 10.3847 / 1538-3881 / ac5685

Presented by the Chinese Academy of Science

Directions: Researchers found 12 semidetached mass-transfer massive binaries in galaxy M31 (2022, April 15) downloaded on April 16, 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-04-semidetached- mass-transfer-massive-binaries-galaxy. html

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