The researchers develop high -performance quantum lights with a modular waveguide device

The researchers develop high -performance quantum lights with a modular waveguide device

The researchers developed an additional optical parametric amplifier (OPA) module (pictured), combined with a photon detector designed to create powerful nonclassical lights that can be used for quantum experiments. Available: Kan Takase, University of Tokyo

For the first time, the researchers successfully developed powerful nonclassical lights using a light source based on modular wave conductor. Implementation is an important task in making quantum optical computers faster.

“Our goal is to significantly improve knowledge by developing fast quantum computers that can perform any type of calculation without error,” said research team member Kan Takase. from the University of Tokyo. “While there are many ways to create a quantum computer, the simpler methods promise because it can create information in a hot room and can easily scale the computing scale.”

In the journal Optica Publishing Group Optic Express, A multi-institutional research group from Japan describing the waveguide optical parametric amplifier (OPA) module they developed for quantum experiments. Combining this device with a specially designed photon sensor allows them to create a state of light called the Schrödinger cat, a superposition of adjacent states.

“Our approach to developing quantum lights can be used to increase the computing power of quantum computers and make the information processor more complex,” says Takase. “Our approach is more efficient than conventional methods, and the OPA modular waveguide is easy to build and integrate with quantum computers.”

Emitting strong nonclassical lights

Continuous wave lighting is used to generate the various quantum states needed to perform quantum computing. For optimal computational performance, the recorded light source must reflect the lowest levels of light loss and be broadband, that is, include all types of frequencies.

“We want to increase the clock frequency of quantum optical computers, which can achieve terahertz frequencies,” Takase said. “High clock frequencies allow for fast computational operations and even shorten the slow lines of optical circuits.

The researchers develop high -performance quantum lights with a modular waveguide device

The researchers developed a new parametric optical waveguide amplifier (OPA) module, combined with a specially designed photon detector (imaged) to create powerful nonclassical lights that can be used for quantum experiments. Available: Kan Takase, University of Tokyo

OPAs use nonlinear optical crystals to generate cutting light, but conventional OPAs do not produce quantum light with the properties necessary for fast quantum computing. To overcome this challenge, researchers from the University of Tokyo and NTT Corporation have developed an OPA based on a wave conductor that achieves high performance by capturing light in an area. narrow glass.

By carefully designing the wave guide and working with precise editing, they were able to create an OPA with a much smaller footprint than conventional tools. It can be modified for use in different experiments with quantum technologies.

Developing the right audience

The OPA device is designed to produce cutting -edge lights in telephone wave loops, a low -frequency long circuit that shows low losses. To complete the system, researchers need a high -speed photon sensor that operates at long telecom wavelengths. However, conventional photon detectors associated with semiconductors do not meet the operating requirements for this application.

Therefore, researchers from the University of Tokyo and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) have developed a device designed for quantum optics. The new superconducting nanostrip photon detector (SNSPD) uses superconductivity technology to detect images.

“We’ve combined our new OPA wave guide with this graphic designer to create a lightweight – a quantum – called Schrödinger cat,” says Takase. “Creating this state -of -the -art is challenging with standard, low -cost OPAs, ensures the high performance of our OPA waveguide and opens up the possibility of using this tool for a wide range of experiments. quantum. “

The researchers are looking at how to combine high -resolution technologies with new OPA waveguides to approach their goal of ultrafast optical quantum computing.


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More information:
Kan Takase et al, Generation of Schrödinger cat states with Wigner negativity using low -frequency wavelength continuous loss of parametric optical amplifiers, Optic Express (2022). DOI: 10.1364 / OE.454123

Directions: Researchers launch high quality quantum lights with a modular waveguide app (2022, April 12) downloaded on April 12, 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-04-high-quality-quantum- modular-waveguide-device.html

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