The laser was first integrated on a lithium niobate chip

The laser was first integrated on a lithium niobate chip

The on-chip laser is combined with a 50 gigahertz electro-optic modulator in lithium niobate to build a high-power transmitter. Available: Second Bay Studios / Harvard SEAS

For recent advances in composite lithium niobate photovoltaic circuits – from frequency assemblies to frequency converters and modulators – one major component has been difficult to integrate: lasers.

Long -distance telephone systems, data center systems, and microwave photonic systems rely on lasers to produce an optical carrier that is used to carry data. In most cases, lasers are unique components, in addition to modulators, that make the entire system more expensive and less stable and scalable.

Now, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) in collaboration with business partners at Freedom Photonics and HyperLight Corporation, have developed the integrated high -speed laser. first on a lithium niobate battery. for high -power electronic systems, fully integrated spectrometers, optical distance detection, and frequency conversion for quantum systems, among other applications.

“Lithium niobate photonics is a promising platform for the development of high-chip-scale optical systems, but the availability of a laser on a lithium niobate chip has been shown to be one of the biggest development challenges. “said Marko Loncar, of Tiantsai Lin. Professor of Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics at SEAS and senior research author. “In this research, we used all nano-fabrication techniques and technologies learned from the previous developments of composite lithium niobate films to overcome those challenges and achieve the goal. goal of integrating a high -power laser on a lithium niobate film platform. “

The research is published in a journal Optics.

Loncar and his team used small but powerful sensory lasers for their integrated chip. On the chip, the lasers reside in small wells or trenches engraved in lithium niobate and deliver up to 60 milliwatts of optical power to the waveguides generated on the platform. like. The researchers combined the laser with a 50 gigahertz electro-optic modulator in lithium niobate to build a high-power transmitter.

“The integration of high-end plug-and-play lasers will significantly reduce the cost, complexity, and power consumption of future communication systems,” said Amirhassan Shams-Ansari, a student graduate in SEAS and lead author of the study. “It’s a building block that can be integrated into large optical systems for a wide range of applications, including sensing, lidar, and telecommunications data.”

By combining lithium niobate photovoltaic applications with high-power lasers using an industrial process, this study demonstrates an important role in the high-volume, low-intensity, and high-performance of transmitter transmitters and optical systems. Then, the company plans to increase the laser’s power and scalability for further applications.


On-chip frequency converters in the gigahertz range can be used in quantum computers and future systems.


More information:
Amirhassan Shams-Ansari et al, The lightning-fired laser beam incorporated on lithium niobate thin film, Optics (2022). DOI: 10.1364 / OPTICA.448617

Presented by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Directions: The first combination laser on a lithium niobate chip (2022, April 8) was downloaded on April 8, 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-04-laser-lithium-niobate-chip.html

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