The growth of the Mexican flag wolf is slowing

The growth of the Mexican flag wolf is slowing

This photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows members of the Mexican Wolf Interagency Field Team working on the wolf’s annual census in January 2022 in southwestern New Mexico. Officials announced on Wednesday, March 30, 2022, that the U.S. number of Mexican dogs has increased by 5% from a year ago, increasing the number of wolves in New Mexico and Arizona by at least 196 animals. Found: Susan Dicks / Mexican Wolf Interagency Field Team at AP

There are more Mexican wolves roaming the southwestern United States than ever before since the federal government began reintroducing the species, officials said. wildlife on Wednesday.

The results of the most recent survey of wolves show that there are about 196 in the wild in New Mexico and Arizona – the sixth straight year in which wolf populations have increased.

But officials with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service say population growth in 2021 will be slowed by a higher rate than pup death. Life has been more difficult for the dogs due to a constant drought that has resulted in low rain and low snowfall, officials said.

Less than 40% of the pups survived by the end of the year, even though the production doubles are set to be 2021.

“We are excited to see the number of Mexican wolf recovery grow each year,” said Brady McGee, director of the Mexico gray wolf recovery dedication program. “The service and our partners continue to make a comeback by improving the genetic health of the wild population and reducing threats, while working together to reduce conflicts with animals. “

Concerns continue about animals being killed by wolves, which are said to be a threat to thieves from animals – riders, unarmed guns and flags. placed in barns near the cattle – not quite enough. Feeding secretaries for wolves stuffed with elk meat or the killing route set up by the authorities to lure wolves away from the animals.

Unlike the reintroduction of the wolf in Yellowstone National Park and other parts of North America, wildlife officials in the Southwest need to work out a way to improve the breeding season. year -round, that is, wolves can plunder animals every year for more than a few months. the year.

The growth of the Mexican flag wolf is slowing

This photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows members of the Mexican Wolf Interagency Field Team working on a wolf that was dated in January 2022 in southwestern New Mexico . Officials announced on Wednesday, March 30, 2022, that the U.S. number of Mexican dogs has increased by 5% from a year ago, increasing the number of wolves in New Mexico and Arizona by at least 196 animals. Found: Susan Dicks / Mexican Wolf Interagency Field Team at AP

The most common subspecies of gray wolf in North America, the Mexican wolf was listed as endangered in the 1970s and a U.S.-Mexico captive breeding program began with the remaining seven wolf.

It is estimated that thousands of Mexican wolves first flew from central Mexico to New Mexico, Arizona and Texas. Predator extermination programs began in the late 1800s. Over the years, thieves were eliminated from the forest.

There are currently about 380 Mexican dogs in more than 60 zoos and other facilities in the two countries. In Mexico, the wild population is about 40, officials said.

The dog rescue team has placed 22 captive pups born in seven wild pits by 2021 as part of a cross-fostering program intended to increase the genetic makeup of the population. Officials said two of the pups have since been arrested and detained and efforts to determine the number of survivors will continue this year.

The company also recorded 25 wolf deaths by 2021. Officials were unable to release many details about those cases involving unarmed shootings.

Locals expect the U.S. population to exceed 200 by 2021. They are demanding that the Fish and Wildlife Service allow thieves to set up new groups in areas in the United States. outside the current healing area in southwestern New Mexico and eastern Arizona.

Locals said the southern Rockies and the Grand Canyon area were ideal places for wolves.

Federal officials are expected this summer to finalize a new rule to regulate the navigation of Mexican flags in the US.


Wildlife officials use pup feeding to boost wolf genetics


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