The Canadian Space Agency funds scientific research on the AstroSat mission

The Canadian Space Agency is providing $ 133k in funding to researchers at three schools for scientific research for the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) AstroSat astronomy satellite.

According to the Canadian Space Agency, AstroSat is ISRO “the first astronomy satellite dedicated to studying the hot and powerful elements around the universe such as young stars and dark craters.” The AstroSat satellite was launched on September 28, 2015.

Canada has provided “optical detectors for the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) on AstroSat.”

The money went to:

  • University of Victoria: Dr. Patrick Côté is studying the galaxies in the Virgo Cluster to better understand the formation of stars.
  • University of Calgary: Dr. Denis Leahy will use the data to calculate the hot stars and star clusters in M31 and to research the nature of the Hercules X-1 binary star system.
  • University of Alberta: Dr. Erik Rosolowsky will document the new stars and their devastating effects on the constellations.
A close -up ultraviolet image of the galaxy NGC 2336 captured by the UVIT sensor on India’s AstroSat observatory.  Located about 105 million light -years from Earth, there are several nebulae in the spiral arms of the galaxy: hot stars that shine in this wave.  Available: UVIT company.
A close -up ultraviolet image of the galaxy NGC 2336 captured by the UVIT sensor on India’s AstroSat observatory. Located about 105 million light -years from Earth, there are several nebulae in the spiral arms of the galaxy: hot stars that shine in this wave. Available: UVIT company.

The CSA said on its website that Canada was “in partnership with the National Research Council Canada, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) also led the development of three Canadian sensors for the UVIT sensor, AstroSat ultraviolet (UV) twinning and optical telescopes. ‘This is a technology that Canada has never developed before,’ said Dr. John Hutchings of the National Research Council Canada, lead researcher for Scientists capture each photon of light as it arrives and record its location and future time. “UVIT telescopes are more efficient than previous ones, and can look at much larger areas of the sky. ‘”

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