Prediction AAA: America will record road trip record for July 4th holiday

(CNN) – Americans see heat in gas, but it won’t keep them from smoking, AAA predicts.

The company’s annual forecast and travel plan for the July 4 holiday weekend says 42 million Americans – more than ever – will travel 50 miles or more. .

While gas prices are rising earlier this month. The national average per gallon on Monday stood at $ 4.98, just a few pennies from a high of $ 5.02 reached a week earlier.

A combination of vacationers and travelers can drive travel times to double the usual length at the highlands on Friday and Friday evenings, experts at Inrix said.

He said some of the busiest roads would then include major roads around Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, and Seattle.

The best time to travel is from Friday to Friday in the early morning or evening, says Inrix. Salt was said to be low on Sundays and Mondays. The 4th of July landed on the Monday of this year.

Gas Safety Tips

The big car was the cause of the slowest traffic in Providence, Rhode Island, on June 16, 2022. This is probably a site that is familiar to most drivers as of July 4 this year.

The big car was the cause of the slowest traffic in Providence, Rhode Island, on June 16, 2022. This is probably a site that is familiar to most drivers as of July 4 this year.

Kris Craig / The Providence Journal / USA Today Network

Those who are stuck on the way to ease the price of gas. There are some suggestions:

• Staying off the main roads: “It’s better not to use servers on the state side,” Ellen Edmonds, director of AAA Public Relations, said in an interview with CNN Travel. Instead, “drive a few miles down the road. Find places to live or remote rural areas.”

• Be jealous of expensive gas stations. If you’re running low on gas and you’re stuck in a place with jacked-up prices, by all means pull up to fill it up. Don’t just fill the path. Burn enough gas to safely get to a place where the cost is reduced.

• Think “near”: There are choices between deciding for a new residence and an epic travel trip, across the country to spend your money on. That is the “nearcation.” Think about places that are close to home but too far away to consider a worthwhile trip.

In heaven

Fly a Boeing 737-932ER by Delta from JFK International Airport.  The AAA says only about 7% of those who fly for the July 4 holiday will fly.

Fly a Boeing 737-932ER by Delta from JFK International Airport. The AAA says only about 7% of those who fly for the July 4 holiday will fly.

Bruce Bennett / photo / file

While the streets are crowded, fewer Americans are flying for vacation, AAA believes.

It is estimated that the 3.55 million people expected to fly on Independence Day make up only 7% of the trip. It’s the lowest level since 2011, when the industry was rebuilding from the Great Recession.

AAA says it will be 14% more expensive than 2021.

Visitors to Hopper said the prices paid this month were around $ 20 from the May average, but trends in flights buying planes fell short. The price for a standard hotel room is 23% higher than last year, AAA said.

Overall, AAA said the travel application was “not over” despite high costs.

“People are ready for a vacation and even though it’s more expensive, they’re looking for ways to spend that much -needed vacation,” says Paula Twidale of AAA Travel.

Learn to fly

CNN Travel asked Kathleen Bangs, a former airline pilot and spokesperson for FlightAware, what travelers can do to prepare themselves for the end and delay this summer.

He gives the following advice about his conversation Monday with an employee at a major U.S. airline:

• Leave cushion time: Don’t go on the day of a big event. Plan to arrive one day in advance.

• Your friend’s apps: If your flight is canceled, reschedule your trip on the flight schedule. You may be able to re -register as soon as possible and get access to the full seats while you are waiting on the phone.

• Use a carrier for necessities: Save what you need for a day or two when you take it. Do not check medications or other necessities.

• Figure out: Don’t take your anger on customer service workers. They don’t decide what to do.

Top photo: A car fills up with oil in Houston. (Aaron M. Sprecher / AP)

CNN’s Forrest Brown and Marnie Hunter contributed to this article.

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