Photocatalyst scientists develop in -house for antiviral coating against various COVID compounds

Scientists develop in-house photocatalyst for antiviral coating against various strains of the novel SARS-CoV coronavirus

TiO2 / CuxO coating eliminates infections under dark conditions. Its antiviral activity is further enhanced by light information. Received: Ryuichi Nakano from Nara Medical University

A photocatalyst made with a mixture of titanium dioxide (TiO2) and copper oxide (CuxO) The nanoclusters do not inhibit different strains of the novel SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. In a recent breakthrough, scientists at Nara Medical University, Kanagawa Institute of Industrial Science and Technology, and Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed this antiviral photocatalyst, which has been shown to work well under darkness and indoor light. .

The novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), responsible for the COVID-19 virus, has infected millions worldwide. The main way the disease is transmitted is through the droplets released by patients into the air. In addition, these droplets are on different sides. Infectious diseases are found in local communities where large numbers of people congregate. Antiviral chemicals, such as alcohol and hydrogen peroxide, are often used to soothe constantly exposed skin. These chemicals actually kill the disease by breaking down its proteins. However, these chemicals are hard to digest and therefore melt. As a result, the disinfection procedure must be performed regularly.

Now in a study published on Scientific Evidence, a research team of Nara Medical University, Kanagawa Institute of Industrial Science and Technology, and Tokyo Institute of Technology has developed a stable photocatalyst as an alternative to cancer prevention. Unlike chemical disinfectants, disinfectants remain permanent for a long time, and since the emergence of viral infection, it has been the subject of significant research around the world. Solid-state antiviral shields have the advantages of being non-toxic, bulky, and chemically stable and thermally stable.

Scientists develop in-house photocatalyst for antiviral coating against various strains of the novel SARS-CoV coronavirus

Small CuxO nanoclasters are bonded on TiO2 particles. Received: Masahiro Miyauchi from Tokyo Institute of Technology

Most of these solid components use TiO2 photocatalysts, when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light, trigger an oxidation effect that can destroy organic matter such as protein spikes found on the surfaces of coronaviruses. However, these covers are used when exposed to UV light, which is not available in normal indoor environments. In most indoor environments, the light is always turned off at night; therefore antiviral agents that work under dark conditions are needed.

Because the cover works under both visible light and dark conditions, the company has developed a partnership with TiO.2 and CuxNano groups. CuxThe nanoclusters were formed with a combined valence oxide, which contained the types Cu (I) and Cu (II). Types of Cu (II) in CuxO provides a visible photocatalysis effect, since Cu (I) plays an important role in denaturing viral proteins, and then induces their inactivation under dark conditions.

By covering the CuxO / TiO2 powder on glass, the company showed that it can eliminate the very strong Delta form of SARS-CoV-2. The company also confirmed that Cu does not produce all types of Alpha, Beta, and GammaxO / TiO2 beyond the wild nature.

Scientists develop in-house photocatalyst for antiviral coating against various strains of the novel SARS-CoV coronavirus

TiO2 / CuxO coating eliminates disease by dissociating and oxidizing spike protein and RNAs of SARS-CoV-2. Received: Ryuichi Nakano from Nara Medical University

The team successfully investigated the antiviral mechanism using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), ELISA assay, and RT-qPCR analysis. These filters strongly consider the Cu (I) to be CuxIt denaturalizes spike proteins and also causes RNA fragmentation of SARS-CoV-2, even under dark conditions. In addition, white irradiation causes photocatalytic oxidation of SARS-CoV-2 organic molecules. Because of this antiviral activity, the current antiviral agent is not limited to a specific type of disease and can eradicate many different types of mutant disease.

White light bulbs are always used in this study as an indoor lighting fixture. This can happen to CuxO / TiO2 The most effective photocatalyst in reducing the incidence of COVID-19 disease is in indoor environments, which are usually light and dark at all times.


Coating the skins with a thin layer of copper can kill the infection quickly. COVID-19


More information:
Inactivation of different types of SARS-CoV-2 by an Indoor-light-sensitive TiO2-based Photocatalyst, Scientific Evidence (2022). DOI: 10.1038 / s41598-022-09402-7

Presented by Tokyo Institute of Technology

Directions: Scientists develop in -house photocatalyst for antiviral coating against various COVID strains (2022, April 14) Retrieved 14 April 2022 from https://phys.org/news /2022-04-scientists-indoor-active-photocatalyst-antiviral-coating .html

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