NASA’s SLS moon rocket, SpaceX’s Falcon 9 shares an event at Kennedy Space Center – Spaceflight Now

Seen from Cape Canaveral National Seashore on Wednesday, NASA’s Space Launch System (left) is stationed in Class 39B and a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket (right) is stationed in Class 39A. Found: Stephen Clark / Spaceflight Now

NASA’s Artemis 1 moon rocket and SpaceX’s Falcon 9 unveiled the event Wednesday at Kennedy Space Center – the first time since 2009 the rockets have landed on two platforms at Launch Complex 39.

The Space Launch System stands at Level 39B in Kennedy, which is awaiting a new numerical costume training ahead of NASA’s Artemis 1 mission, an unplanned missile to the moon with the Orion team capsule.

About 8,700 feet (2.7 kilometers) to the south, the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is stationed directly at level 39A, in position to launch Friday on a full -scale spacecraft to the International Space Station. SpaceX’s Dragon Endeavor spacecraft was aboard the Falcon 9 to take the four spacecraft to the airport.

It has been common in recent years to see airplanes on two of Kennedy’s planes, but the last time a plane was on both planes at the same time in May 2009, when the Endeavor was in class 39B when the Atlantis was released. pad 39A on a service mission to the Hubble Space Telescope.

The Dragon Endeavor spacecraft was named in honor of the retired spacecraft.

Kennedy’s planes were first built in 1960 for NASA’s Saturn 5 moon rock, then converted for the spacecraft program.

Pad 39A, the departure point for the first lunar mission and first spacecraft, was leased to SpaceX in 2014. The business began firing Falcon 9 rockets from the building. history in 2017. It was SpaceX’s only platform for commercial missions and for the company’s powerful Falcon Heavy rock launches, using three Falcon 9 rock cranes recorded Ia.

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket (left) and NASA’s Space Launch System (right) share the same event at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center on Wednesday. Courtesy: NASA / Joel Kowsky

Pad 39B was used by NASA, which developed the building for the Space Launch System.

The SLS is the largest rocket NASA intends to use for astronaut missions to the moon. The Artemis 1 test mission is a prelude to the release of upcoming teams on the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft, starting with the Artemis 2 mission, which is scheduled to run around the previous month. o 2024.

Future missions will be connected to a man -numbered archipelago near the moon to take astronauts under the moon’s surface. SpaceX is in agreement to build the first one using a derivative of its super-heavy lift reusable Starship rocket, which itself is in development with a higher lifting capacity than the Space Launch System.

Here’s how the SLS and Falcon 9 were recorded.

Aircraft system / Orion:

  • 322 feet (98 meters) high
  • 8.8 million pounds of release
  • 95 metric tons of cargo in low Earth orbit
  • Census
  • All major tools can be converted
  • Up to $ 4.1 billion per aircraft (according to NASA inspector general estimate)

Falcon 9 / Crew Dragon:

  • 215 feet (65 meters) high
  • 1.7 million pounds of release
  • 22.8 metric tons in low Earth orbit (with increasing frequency)
  • Tall man
  • The first level and the Dragon Crew can be reused; The second level and the box will be completed
  • Up to $ 220 million per flight (according to NASA inspector general estimate)
Seen from Cape Canaveral National Seashore on Wednesday, NASA’s Space Launch System (left) is stationed in Class 39B and a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket (right) is stationed in Class 39A. Found: Stephen Clark / Spaceflight Now

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Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: @ StephenClark1.

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