My 200-year-old ‘Pristine’ opened in England

(CNN) – A 200 -year -old “pure” cobalt mine has been discovered in Cheshire, in the north -west of England, revealing a collection of personal belongings left behind by workers.

The mine, which was built during the Napoleonic Wars, is found in the village of Alderley Edge. It is believed to have been abandoned in 1810, according to a release from the UK conservation charity the National Trust on Tuesday.

Leather shoes, clay pipes, a metal button from clothing and machines were some of the items I had.

The inscriptions inscribed in the candlestick were also removed, as well as a clay vase planted by the sage miners in the wall to show their appreciation for the mineral’s goodness.

Jamie Lund (left) and Derbyshire Caving Club member Ed Coghlan (right) are National Trust geographers at the unused cobalt pit in the English village of Alderley Edge.

Jamie Lund (left) and Derbyshire Caving Club member Ed Coghlan (right) are National Trust geographers at the unused cobalt pit in the English village of Alderley Edge.

Paul Harris / National Trust

Other things that were noticed were physical prints from my staff, such as fingers in the clay used to carry the lights and the corduroy sealing from the clothes. of a worker where they rested on the wall.

Members of the Derbyshire Caving Club witnessed the last fall, the newspaper said, with experts investigating ever since.

A glass covered with a tight rope was one of the researchers found in the pit.

A glass covered with a tight rope was one of the researchers found in the pit.

Ed Coghlan / Derbyshire Caving Club

Ed Coghlan, a member of the Derbyshire Caving Club, said the group had searched for unused historic mines and produced some “important” information, but the new information was unique.

“Having a mine in a clean environment, with personal belongings and documentation, is sacred,” Coghlan said in the release.

“It was an important window in the past until the last day when mine workers stopped their jobs.”

This leather shoe of the digger was first dug in the pit.

This leather shoe of the digger was first dug in the pit.

Ed Coghlan / Derbyshire Caving Club

Coghlan added that one of the remains was a windlass lifter, which is usually taken for reuse in other mines. Researchers said when he left workers were ordered to gather up their tools and leave “without much comment.”

The land belongs to the National Trust, which has been leased to the association since the 1970s.

Researchers have taken and registered things like this little blue button of an excavator.

Researchers have taken and registered things like this little blue button of an excavator.

Ed Coghlan / Derbyshire Caving Club

Cobalt was used in 19th century England to make a blue dye on glass and pottery. Digging in England was very short. He was supported during the Napoleonic Wars from 1803 to 1815, when the importation of foreigners was banned. However, trading began soon after the fighting ended, which meant some mines – such as the one at Alderley Edge – were closed, the newspaper said.

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