Former Canadian striker Bjarni Tryggvason has passed away at the age of 76

Bjarni Tryggvason passed away yesterday at the age of 76 and in the words of his friend and star partner Chris Hadfield, “he was a pioneer, an excellent engineer and a test pilot, and a loving friend. One of Canada’s first astronauts, Bjarni opened the way for all who followed.

Mr. News. Tryggvason’s death was first published online on Tuesday by his friend and former NASA pilot Leland Melvin as collectSpace. Melvin wrote on Instagram, “Relax Penguin classmate. It’s an honor to learn and work with you Bjarni Tryggvason. Love the family. Thank you very much.”

SpaceQ contacted Chris Hadfield who said this about his friend;

I was shocked and saddened by the news of Bjarni’s passing.

The gleam in his eyes always tells you that he sees the world in a different way – with a clear sense of engineering, the look of a pilot, and the fun of a humorist.

He was a good friend and friendly – I had no idea I had met an independent freelancer, and I enjoyed sharing life with such an enthusiastic driver.

He was a pioneer, an excellent engineer and a pilot, and a loving friend. Although he was one of Canada’s first astronauts, Bjarni prepared the way for all who followed.

In the Twitter the Canadian Space Agency published this letter and told SpaceQ a word to follow; “With great sadness and a heavy heart we learned that CSA astronaut Bjarni Tryggvason has passed away.”

Marc Garneau, one of six astronauts posted on Twitter “I can’t believe my friend Bjarni Tryggvason has passed away. We were selected as pilots in 1983. He was a skilled engineer He taught me to fly and corrected me patiently when I was wrong. He was a good man. I love him. “

The first group of Canadian astronauts was selected in 1983. Last row, from left to right: Ken Money, Marc Garneau, Steve MacLean and Bjarni Tryggvason.  Seated: Robert Thirsk and Roberta Bondar.  Available: Canadian Space Agency.
The first group of Canadian astronauts was selected in 1983. Last row, from left to right: Ken Money, Marc Garneau, Steve MacLean and Bjarni Tryggvason. Seated: Robert Thirsk and Roberta Bondar. Available: Canadian Space Agency.

The Canadian Space Agency also said that Mr. Tryggvason, “(he was) one of the first six Canadian aircraft selected in December 1983. He flew on the Space Shuttle Discovery on August 7, 1997, as a paid engineer for the STS-85. Bjarni was an engineer, a pilot, an educator and a craftsman. He used the highest standards in everything he did. “

Mr. Wright said. Tryggvason was born on September 21, 1945, in Reykjavik, Iceland. He graduated from the University of British Columbia with a Bachelor of Applied Science in Engineering Physics in 1972 and then went on to graduate from the University of Western Ontario.

The Canadian Space Agency story on Mr. Tryggvason’s experience reads:

Bjarni Tryggvason was a meteorologist with the cloud physics team at the Meteorlogic Service Canada (formerly the Atmospheric Environment Service) in Toronto in 1972 and 1973. Since then, he has served as a research fellow in aerodynamics. Worked at the Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel Laboratory at the University of Western Ontario from 1974 to 1979.

Mr. Wright said. Tryggvason was a visiting research fellow at the University of Kyoto, Kyoto, Japan, in 1979 and at James Cook University of North Queensland, in Townsville, Australia in 1980. He is a lecturer in Applied Mathematics at the University of Western Ontario from 1980 to 1982.

From 1982 to 1984, Mr. Tryggvason was a researcher at the Low Speed ​​Aerodynamics Laboratory at the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and a lecturer at the University of Ottawa and Carleton University from 1982 to 1992.

Appointed as one of the first six Canadian astronauts in December 1983, Mr. Tryggvason was trained as a return engineer for the CANEX-2 set of experiments, which flew on Mission STS-52 in October 1992. He was also the project engineer for the Space Vision System Target Spacecraft, which designed To that missionary.

Mr. Wright said. Tryggvason has served as a principal investigator for these projects: the development of the Large Motion Isolation Mount (LMIM) that frequently flies on NASA spacecraft KC-135 and DC-9; The Microgravity Vibration Isolation Mount (MIM) was used at the Russian airport, Mir, from April 1996 to January 1998 to support several Canadian and American experiments in economic science and water physics; and the MIM-2 that flew on STS-85 in August 1997. He was the founder and technician during the initial development of the Microgravity Vibration Isolation Subsystem (MVIS), developed by the CSA for the European Space Agency Fluid Science Laboratory. for the ISS.

After the Space Shuttle Discovery landed on Route 33 at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), the six crew arranged for the final photo.  The landing, at 7:08 am (EDT), August 19, 1997, marked the end of a 12-day STS-85 mission.  To the left and right are Bjarni Tryggvason of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), with astronauts Stephen K. Robinson, the missionary engineer;  N. Jan Davis, freight officer;  Curtis L. Brown, Jr., missionary leader;  Kent V. Rominger, pailaka;  and Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., a missionary lawyer.  Found: NASA.
After the Space Shuttle Discovery landed on Route 33 at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), the six crew arranged for the final photo. The landing, at 7:08 am (EDT), August 19, 1997, marked the end of a 12-day STS-85 mission. To the left and right are Bjarni Tryggvason, Canadian Space Agency (CSA) paid engineer, with astronauts Stephen K. Robinson, missionary lawyer; N. Jan Davis, freight officer; Curtis L. Brown, Jr., missionary leader; Kent V. Rominger, pilot; and Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., a missionary lawyer. Found: NASA.

On August 7, 1997, Mr. Tryggvason flew as a paid engineer on the Space Shuttle Discovery on Mission STS-85. His main task was to test the MIM-2 and perform water science experiments designed to monitor the vibrations of aircraft, in order to develop a better understanding of the usefulness of aircraft. Systems such as MIM on the International Space Station (ISS), and learn. the impact of the tremors in several experiments performed on the ISS.

In August 1998, he was invited to participate in a NASA missionary training camp held at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. His class consisted of two years of physical training and education, and he enlisted the first group of astronauts to be trained as both as an aircraft engineer and as a crew. cruise for the ISS.

After completing his mission training, he joined NASA as a team envoy for the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory (SAIL), which was used to test flight applications before the use on board a ship. He has also supported integrated simulations at the ISS Training Facility at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, and has served as a CSA delegate on the NASA Microgravity Measurement Working Group and on the ISS Microgravity Analytic Integration. Team.

From between 2001 and 2003 he worked in the private sector during his retirement from CSA. He returned to work at CSA in 2004 and currently holds the position of tourism professor at the University of Western Ontario.

He authored more than 50 published papers and holds three patents.

NASA STS-85 Day 01 Special

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6c_WUFdIGE

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