Food poisoning is a problem for military service members and veterans: Shots

There were problems with food poisoning that were unique to the military.

Al Tielemans / Sports Illustrated and Getty Images


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Al Tielemans / Sports Illustrated and Getty Images


There were problems with food poisoning that were unique to the military.

Al Tielemans / Sports Illustrated and Getty Images

Chandler Rand has struggled with a variety of foodborne illnesses since childhood. Although she said she was healthy now, she described her healing as a routine. She has to fight negative feelings about her body image and depression.

“It’s like walking a tightrope,” Rand said.

In 2016, Rand was a Marine. He was well treated for anorexia in his youth, but after camp he began to eat a lot and became bulimic.

“I didn’t think I saw that as my diet at the time,” Rand said. “I think I just saw myself as a good Marine.”

For Rand, it’s about fulfilling the most important martial arts for weight and body fat. At the same time, he recorded an abuse that took place during his time in college.

He said the loading of his food was related.

“You just want to look at something different than fear and anxiety or sadness and guilt,” he said. “So you try to put this high standard on diet and health.”

People like Rand, who developed food abuse during their service, are not widely known from the Department of Defense or Veterans Affairs. But a study between Iraq and Afghanistan during the war by the VA in Connecticut shows that they experienced bulimia at about three times the civilian population.

Some people had trouble eating during the army, and others struggled with eating after they went outside.

“I see a high rate of binge eating disorder in the older population, but I also want to know about these other disorders,” said Robin Masheb, a research psychologist and founder of the Veterans Initiative for Eating and Weight. It is one of the few programs to teach foodborne illness to the elderly.

He said the challenges to the military were more important than the demands.

Robin Masheb, founder of the Veterans Initiative for Eating and Weight, is one of the few researchers studying eating disorders in the elderly.

Desiree D’lorio / WSHU


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Desiree D’lorio / WSHU


Robin Masheb, founder of the Veterans Initiative for Eating and Weight, is one of the few researchers studying eating disorders in the elderly.

Desiree D’lorio / WSHU

“People talk about living in high food conditions where one goes for a long time without eating anything, or eating very fast under certain conditions. “said Masheb. “Those kinds of things are a problem for preparing people for problems with their eating habits later in life.”

He said more of the old people were abused by food.

For Rand, it’s all of the above: “I think the military, apart from the high demands and the pressure, can be a real threat to food poisoning.”

He said that the importance of a warrior’s life depends on numbers and rules.

“You get it in your fitness tests and your wrestling fitness tests, and there are point systems for performance and skill and coordination,” Rand said. “You always want to enter that kind of correct number, and for me, that’s another number I’ll meet.”

Masheb’s new research confirms the ability of VA doctors to look at the past for food allergies. He tries all sorts of ways to ask the ancients questions about their relationship with food.

“Normally, men – and more commonly, our veterans – don’t like that word of powerlessness,” Masheb said. “Being in the military is about power.”

Masheb received a grant from the Department of Defense to try a virtual drug to help seniors with foodborne illness. But she says they face other challenges, such as ending reports that foodborne illness is only affecting young women, or that patients are more likely to suffer from malnutrition. a food allergy.

In March, the Department released new guidelines to provide new leeway for service members to remove the limits of stress and health conditions.

Masheb and Rand agree this is a small place on the right track. But it’s up to leaders to decide if they want to continue to rely on body mass index, which they use height to determine weight goals.

Rand said the height and weight were not right for him.

“If people know you don’t have to meet this number, or less than that number, I don’t think it will increase the number of people,” he said. “I think it’s easy to think.”

This story came to us WSHU in Connecticut, and is made by North Carolina Public Radio American Homefront Project, a public media company that chronicles American military life and antiquity. Earn money from Association for public publication.

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