Colombian researchers are looking for protection for disappearances in the urban jungle

The UN estimates that nearly half of the insect pollinators, including bees and butterflies, can destroy the earth.

The UN estimates that nearly half of insect pollinators, including bees and insects, can destroy the earth.

Far away from the flower gardens of their native home, bee bees infested with pesticides in rural Colombia are seeking sanctuary at universities in the capital, Bogota.

Although hives have been banned from the city because of the risk that baby waste can infect people, universities are welcome to release it for research reasons.

At the University of Rosario, biologist Andre Riveros carefully feeds the wasp on sugar cane juice, paying close attention to how it spreads its grass -like tongue, or proboscis, into the sweet water.

The university boasts a fireplace in a bamboo hut about six meters (nearly 20 feet) high, surrounded by trees and flowers.

Here, Riveros and his team are studying a colony of bees in hopes of developing a food additive that provides important pollinators protection from insecticides.

“Pesticides eliminate certain (neurological) areas such as impairment of learning and memory and (pesticides) eliminate the same risks as Alzheimer’s,” Riveros told the AFP.

“We’re trying to find a solution to the problem of disappearance,” he added. “We’re trying to prevent the loss, by the way.”

The company’s work produces the Apis mellifera, or Western Honey Bee, one of 20,000 species found worldwide.

Hundreds of hives have been killed in Colombia in recent years

Hundreds of hives have been killed in Colombia in recent years.

Hundreds of hives have been killed in Colombia in recent years, and research has pointed to the cause as fipronil, an insecticide banned in Europe and installed in the United States and China. .

Fipronil has been widely used in a healthy avocado and citrus boom in Colombia, even though the Latin American country stopped using some of the plants for six months last year.

‘Go to school’

Elsewhere in Bogota, EAN University has built its own hives, which stand on top of a six -story building overlooking a city of eight million people.

Beekeeper Gino Cala takes honey out of the hives as part of his job to teach and help colleges navigate city apiaries.

But Cala said AFP Colombia’s rise was “running in the fields” due to “lack of use of agrochemicals.”

“These babies are important and important … because they help ensure a part of Colombia’s and global food security,” he said.

  • The Apis mellifera or Western Honey Bee is one of 20,000 species found worldwide

    The Apis mellifera or Western Honey Bee is one of 20,000 species found worldwide.

  • About 1.4 billion jobs and three -quarters of plants around the world, according to a 2016 study, rely on pollinators - a lot.

    About 1.4 billion jobs and three -quarters of plants around the world, according to a 2016 study, rely on pollinators – mostly bees.

  • Scientists in Colombia are trying to develop a food supplement that will provide protection from pesticides

    Scientists in Colombia are trying to develop a food supplement that will provide protection from pesticides.

From the EAN campus, Cala bees help pollinate plants all around.

About 1.4 billion jobs and three -quarters of plants around the world, according to a 2016 study, rely on pollinators – most of them bees – that provide free fertilization services to help. measuring billions of dollars.

In recent years, fungi in North America, Europe, Russia, South America and elsewhere have begun to die from “collapse disorder,” a mysterious disease caused by pesticides but to mites, diseases and fungi.

The UN estimates that nearly half of insect pollinators, including bees and insects, can destroy the earth.

Despite the city’s ban, there are private cattle ranchers in Bogota that sell products such as honey, pollen or beeswax.

The Bogota fire department says it goes through eight cases of killing the missing person on average each day.


Colombian protesters say the bees should be killed


© 2022 AFP

Directions: Colombian researchers seek safety for bees in urban forests (2022, April 5) Retrieved 5 April 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-04-colombian -safety-bees-urban-jungle.html

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