Apollo Moon is 50 years unveiled for the first time

Moon samples were released from Apollo 17 in 1972 for the first time in 50 years. It is the lower part of the pipeline collected in the Taurus-Littrow valley of the Moon. The upper half opened in 2019. Credit: NASA / Robert Markowitz

Pieces of rock and soil collected by Apollo 17 astronauts in 1972, which had been “recorded for posterity” 50 years ago, were removed from their space shuttle in March.

On March 21 and 22, a team of NASA scientists uncovered a historical cover -up of what the company described as a very, very slow, process.

Deputy Apollo sample curator Juliane Gross used the “mock-up” rocks at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston as a tool to keep the moon’s samples.

The Apollo 17 model 73001 team prepares before the new model unveiled at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.  From left, Charis Krysher, Andrea Mosie, Juliane Gross and Ryan Zeigler.  Photography and Photography: NASA / Robert Markowitz

The Apollo 17 model 73001 team prepares before the new model unveiled at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. From left, Charis Krysher, Andrea Mosie, Juliane Gross and Ryan Zeigler. Photography and Photography: NASA / Robert Markowitz

“We were the first to really see this country for the first time,” Gross said in a news release on March 23. “It’s just the best thing in the world – like a child in a in the clothing store, huh? “

Gross said that removing the samples requires a good set -up, looking at all the small pieces and coils using special tools.

The specimens were collected in December 1972 by NASA astronauts Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt and sealed with pearls in cylindrical drive tubes while they were on the moon’s surface.

After being sent back to Earth, the samples were stored in a double shield at Johnson’s lunar plant until they opened last week.

An x-ray computed tomography of Apollo 17 core sample 73001 taken at the University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences, a member of the Apollo Next Generation Sample Analysis team.  Caption and Photo Credit: University of Texas and Austin Jackson School of Geosciences

An x-ray computed tomography of Apollo 17 core sample 73001 taken at the University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences, a member of the Apollo Next Generation Sample Analysis team.
Caption and Photo Credit: University of Texas and Austin Jackson School of Geosciences

Some of the samples collected are stored in a timeline that can be passed on to future generations with improved technology to observe and gather more information about the moon’s surface. NASA says the Apollo 17 core sample 73001 is one of the unopened lunar samples of the Apollo era.

“We have the opportunity to address some important questions about the Moon by learning from what has been recorded and maintained in the regolith of these Apollo regions,” said Francis McCubbin, an analyst. NASA astromaterials, in the same language.

NASA believes the samples and gas collected from Apollo 17 could provide the information and details needed in preparation for Artemis missions and beyond. The company expects new samples to be collected from the moon before 2025 by astronauts on the Artemis 3 mission.

The video is by NASA

Presented: Apollo 17 Apollo Program Artemis project Johnson Space Center Lead Stories Moon NASA

Theresa Cross

Theresa Cross grew up on the Space Coast. It is common to develop a desire for something “Space” and its quest. During these founding years, he also recognized a talent and a love of explaining the differences and complexities in people, nature, and machines. From a family of photographers – including her father and son, Theresa began drawing her own world through photography at a young age. As an adult, he has demonstrated the ability to truly combine the desires of his heart and his love of technology to give his work a unique and artistic presentation. . Theresa has a background in water chemistry, water energy, and business ethics.

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